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English online interview dates 2022

English Online Interview,Assessment requirements and mandatory period

50 rows · Classics and English: First interviews, usually just with a first college, will take place Please see the subject-specific provisional interview timetable for interviews in December (for entry), which will be held online. Explore the information here to find out what to  · In this article, we provide online interview tips to aid you before, during and after a virtual call with a prospective employer. 15 online interview tips. Preparation is a critical  · If you want to prepare by reviewing the top 10 interview questions and answers, here’s an overview. 1. "Tell Me About Yourself " This classic opening question should The English Online Interview (EOI) is a powerful online tool for assessing the English skills of students between Foundation and Year 2 and is aligned to English in the Victorian Curriculum ... read more

Monday 5 December to Thursday 8 December 2pm on Friday 9 December Monday 12 December and Tuesday 13 December Modern Languages and Linguistics First college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6, Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 December. Monday 5 December to Thursday 8 December 2pm on Friday 9 December Monday 12 December and Tuesday 13 December Philosophy and Modern Languages First college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6, Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 December.

Monday 5 December to Thursday 8 December 2pm on Friday 9 December Monday 12 December and Tuesday 13 December Music First and second college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December.

Decisions regarding departmental interviews will be communicated to applicants by 2pm on Thursday 8 December. Departmental interviews will take place on Monday 12 December. Monday 5 December to Wednesday 7 December 2pm on Thursday 8 December Monday 12 December Oriental Studies Departmental interviews will take place on Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December. First college interviews will take place between Wednesday 7 and Friday 9 December. Additional interviews will take place between Thursday 8 and Tuesday 14 December.

Tuesday 6 December to Wednesday 7 December 5pm on Friday 9 December Thursday 8 December and Tuesday 14 December Philosophy, Politics and Economics Most first college interviews will take place on Monday 5 and Tuesday 6 December, although some interviews for overseas candidates will take place in the week commencing Monday 29 November, and some interviews may take place on the morning of Wednesday 7 December.

Second college interviews will take place on Friday 9, Monday 12, Tuesday 13 and Wednesday 14 December. Monday 5 December to Tuesday 6 December 11am on Thursday 8 December Friday 9 December to Wednesday 14 December Physics First college interviews will take place on Wednesday 7, Thursday 8, Friday 9 and Monday 12 December.

Candidates will have interviews at their first college on Monday 12 and second college on Monday 12 or Tuesday Interviews can take place on any weekday between Monday 28 November and Friday 16 December, although most interviews will take place between Monday 5 and Tuesday Each shortlisted candidate will be interviewed by two colleges, with the interviews with the first college on Thursday 8 December and interviews with the second college on Friday 9 December.

First college interviews will take place between Monday 5 and Thursday 8 December. First college interviews will take place on Monday 5 and Tuesday 6 December. First interviews, usually just with a first college, will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6, Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 December. First college interviews will take place on Wednesday 7, Thursday 8 and Friday 9 December.

Most interviews will take place on Monday 12, Tuesday 13 and Wednesday 14 December, and some interviews may take place on Thursday 15 December. First college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December. Candidates will have a departmental panel interview on any of Monday 5, Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December. Each candidate will have two interviews across Monday 5 and Tuesday 6 December they may or may not be on the same day.

First and second college interviews will take place on Tuesday 6, Wednesday 7, Thursday 8 and Friday 9 December. Each candidate will have one interview at each of two different colleges, with either interview taking place on any of Thursday 8, Monday 12, Tuesday 13 and Wednesday Most first and second college interviews will take place on Monday 12, Tuesday 13, Wednesday 14 and Thursday 15 December, although some interviews for overseas candidates will take place in the week commencing Monday 5 December.

Each shortlisted candidate will be interviewed by two colleges, with the interviews being either on Monday 12 or Tuesday 13 December. Each shortlisted candidate will be interviewed by two colleges, with the interviews with the first college on Wednesday 14 and interviews with the second college on Thursday 15 December.

First college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6, Wednesday 7 and Thursday 8 December. First and second college interviews will take place on Monday 5, Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December. Departmental interviews will take place on Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 December. Most first college interviews will take place on Monday 5 and Tuesday 6 December, although some interviews for overseas candidates will take place in the week commencing Monday 29 November, and some interviews may take place on the morning of Wednesday 7 December.

First college interviews will take place on Wednesday 7, Thursday 8, Friday 9 and Monday 12 December. From , the EOI will also be mandatory for all Grade 1 students in Victorian government schools. In , there will be separate but overlapping mandatory assessment periods for Foundation and Grade 1 students:.

From , every Grade 1 Victorian government school student will have their literacy skills, including phonics, assessed each year in Term 1 through the enhanced EOI.

This is a new requirement for Grade 1 government school students to help them in learning to read. Currently, screening for phonics is included in the EOI. Additional phonics items are being added to the EOI and will be ready for use in Term 1, All Grade 1 students will be assessed using the enhanced Module 2 in the EOI. The new phonics items being included in the enhanced EOI will provide valuable insights for teachers around how students are progressing with using phonics knowledge and skills, specifically to read words.

This will provide additional support for teachers to identify students who need help in the decoding aspect of reading and enable teachers to respond early before reading problems become entrenched. It will also assist teachers to differentiate teaching according to student need.

Assessing Grade 1 students. From , the EOI assessment period for Grade 1 students in Victorian government schools will take place in Term 1 each year to ensure maximum benefit for teacher planning purposes.

Module 2 has been developed to be conducted at this time and maps to the beginning Grade 1 Victorian Curriculum. As with Module 1 for Foundation students, Module 2 is designed to be used in an individual assessment session with each Grade 1 student, supported by an EOI resource kit.

Each government school will be sent a set of EOI kits ahead of the assessment period. The Grade 1 assessment period will run for 5 weeks to provide schools with maximum flexibility around how and when to conduct the assessment.

The assessment period for Grade 1 students will be separate to and overlapping with the Foundation EOI assessment period in Term 1, This approach will also help schools manage casual relief teacher availability.

Further information about assessment period dates will be available in the coming weeks. Support for the new requirement. As part of this investment, schools will receive the equivalent of 2 days of casual relief teacher funding to support every Grade 1 teacher to use the EOI with their students in and Chemistry, Computer Science, Computer Science and Philosophy, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics and Philosophy, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics, Physics and Philosophy.

You will also need a touchscreen device and basic universal stylus so you can access and write on a Miro whiteboard.

It is possible that if the computer used to access Teams is touchscreen, no separate touchscreen device will be needed and the Miro whiteboard can be run on this at the same time. See the note under technology required below for further details. For interviews in this tier, in addition to the device on which you are accessing Microsoft Teams, you will also need a basic universal stylus and a touchscreen device for accessing a Miro Whiteboard www.

The computer will need to be able to run Teams and Miro in separate windows tablets using App versions may not allow this functionality. Any universal capacitive basic stylus will allow candidates to work collaboratively on the Miro whiteboard.

The Teams window may be reduced during collaborative use of Miro to allow sufficient space for whiteboard workings. Create a Miro account so you can practise using a white board before your interview — this is free to do.

Either before your interview or at the start of your interview, you will receive a link by email to a Miro whiteboard from the college running your interview. You will need to be able to access this link on your touchscreen device in order to access the whiteboard you will use in your interview, so you should login to your email account on this device before your interview starts. Interviewers may wish to show you a document by sharing their screen, by pasting it into the Miro whiteboard, or by holding something up to the camera for you to see.

In addition, the interviewers may use the Miro whiteboard to write out mathematical notation, draw sketches, annotate diagrams or text, or to add text. You may be asked to do the following using Miro on your touchscreen device and a stylus :. Read our additional guidance for those needing to register with Miro and using Miro in tier 3 interviews.

We know that these things can sometimes be a problem, and your interviewers will understand. Remember your interviewers will want you to do well, and be able to see your potential. If the technology goes wrong or the connection is bad, make sure you tell your interviewers so that they are aware.

Required for: Ancient and Modern History, Archaeology and Anthropology, Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, Classics, Classics and English, Classics and Modern Languages, Classics and Oriental Studies, English and Modern Languages, English Language and Literature, European and Middle Eastern Languages, Fine Art, Geography, History, History and English, History and Modern Languages, History and Politics, History of Art, Human Sciences, Law, Law with Law Studies in Europe, Materials Science, Medicine, Medicine Graduate-entry , Modern Languages, Modern Languages and Linguistics, Oriental Studies, Philosophy and Modern Languages, Philosophy and Theology, Psychology, Religion and Oriental Studies, Theology and Religion.

Download the full transcript of the Tier 1 video. Required for: Biochemistry, Economics and Management, History and Economics, Music, Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

Download the full transcript of the Tier 2 video. Required for: Chemistry, Computer Science, Computer Science and Philosophy, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Mathematics and Philosophy, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics, Physics and Philosophy. Download the full transcript of the Tier 3 video.

These sample interview questions come direct from the tutors who conduct the interviews. We hope they'll make you think, and help you understand why we ask the questions that we do. Would you expect this compound to be more soluble in octanol or water?

It is more useful for us to see how the candidate applies their chemical knowledge to a problem they are unlikely to have considered before, how they justify their conclusions and whether they are capable of considering alternative possibilities. If a student struggles with a starting point we would prompt them to describe more generally the different kinds of interactions that hold molecules together and to comment on their relative strength. We would then encourage them to think about what interactions the specific compound might make first with octanol and then with water.

A good approach to answering the question would be to first consider the individual functional groups separately and then to discuss the compound as a whole. The extension to this question asks the student to interpret some graphical data and requires a more technical introduction.

We are careful at this point to make sure that the student has understood the explanation before moving forward with the question. The relative solubility of a compound in octanol vs aqueous solution can be determined by putting a sample of the compound in a mixture of octanol and aqueous solution and then measuring the concentration of the compound that has dissolved in each of the solvents.

For one particular compound the relative solubility varies with pH as shown in the graph below. Can you interpret this graph? The aim of this question is to see whether the student can understand a new concept and apply it to a problem. One approach to this question is to first consider the flat regions of the graph. Between pH 0 and 4 the compound has a relative solubility very close 4. The student can use the equation to work out that this corresponds to much more of the compound dissolving in octanol than in water.

In contrast, between pH 9 and 14 the relative solubility of approximately zero corresponds to almost equal concentrations of the compound dissolving in octanol and water. The student then needs to consider how the structure of a compound might change as pH is varied. Ultimately the prompts lead to the idea that the charge of a compound can change with pH due to gain or loss of hydrogen ions. The graph shown here corresponds to a compound where the vast majority of the molecules are neutrally charged between pH 0 and 4.

As the pH is raised a greater proportion of the molecules will lose a hydrogen ion to become negatively charged, being charged reduces the solubility in octanol and so the relative solubility decreases. The plateau region above pH 9 occurs because almost all of molecules have lost the hydrogen ion by this point. Although the compound becomes negatively charged, it does not become more soluble in water than octanol, this suggests that the compound also includes functional groups that interact well with octanol, such as alkyl chains or rings.

It is important to note that a student would not have to make all of these points to do well in the interview. This question encourages students to think about what high-diversity habitats such as rainforests and coral reefs have in common. In many cases, patterns or correlations can help us to identify the underlying mechanisms. For example, a student might point out that both rainforests and coral reefs are found in hot countries and near the equator. The best answers will attempt to unravel exactly what it is about being hot or near the equator that might allow numerous types of plant and animal to arise, persist and coexist.

Do new species evolve more frequently there, or go extinct less frequently? Once students have come up with a plausible theory, I'd follow up by asking them how they would go about testing their idea. What sort of data would they need? The main aim of the question is to get applicants to think about biological topics and put them in the context of successful adaptations to life on earth.

So I might expect students to start by thinking of some stripey animals, then move on to thinking about categories of striped animals — for example those that are dangerous such as wasps, tigers, and snakes , those that have stripes for camouflage such as zebras but also tigers , and those whose stripes are harmless mimics of dangerous ones.

They might think of specific examples for detailed comparison: tigers and zebras for example both have stripes for camouflage and blending in with background, one to hide from prey and the other to hide from predators.

Other things that would be worth considering include whether stripes may only occur in the young of a species; whether the colour of the stripes matters rather than just the contrasting stripe pattern, and why do stripe size, shape, width and pattern vary in different species. There are no right or wrong specific answers to the questions — I'm just interested in candidates' speculations about the advantages of having stripes. We wouldn't actually phrase the question this way — we give the student a cactus in a pot and a close-up photo of the cactus's surface structure and ask them to describe the object in as much detail as possible using the plant and the photo.

We are looking for observation, attention to detail, both at the large and micro scale. We ask them to account for what they see — this means they don't have to use memory or knowledge about cacti even if they have it but to deduce the uses and functions of the shapes, sizes, structures that they have just described. So for example, why be fat and bulbous, why have large sharp spines, surrounded by lots of very small hair-like spines?

Why does it have small cacti budding off the main body? There will frequently be more than one logical answer to these questions, and we are likely to follow one answer with another question — for example:. If you could save either the rainforests or the coral reefs, which would you choose? I'd expect students to be able to use their general knowledge plus their common sense to come up with an answer — no detailed knowledge is required.

Students might then be asked about the importance of natural features, such as biodiversity and rare species, and human interests, such as the fuel and food, ecotourism and medicines we get from rainforests or reefs. Finally there are impacts to consider from climate change, soil erosion, pollution, logging, biofuel replacement, overfishing, etc.

The final answer doesn't matter — both reefs and rainforests must be managed sustainably to balance conservation and human needs. Firstly candidates should define 'easier' — does it mean less complexity, less energy expenditure, less highly evolved, less likely to be eaten etc? Then candidates could think of problems caused by living in the sea, such as high salinity, high pressure, lack of light etc.

Problems living on land include extra support for the body, avoiding desiccation, the need for more complex locomotory systems legs, wings etc and hence better sensory and nervous systems etc. Then ask in which of the two ecosystems have animals and plants been more successful? So now they have to define 'successful' Some of the best interview questions do not have a 'right' or a 'wrong' answer, and can potentially lead off in all sorts of different directions.

Applicants might have picked up ideas about the function of a lion's mane from independent reading or from watching natural history documentaries. That's fine — but I'd follow up their response by asking how they would test their theory. When I've used this question in interviews I've had all sorts of innovative suggestions, including experiments where lions have their manes shaved to investigate whether this influences their chances with the opposite sex or helps them win fights over territory.

Many Biology tutors use plant or animal specimens — often alive — as a starting point for questions and discussion, so applicants shouldn't be surprised if they are asked to inspect and discuss an insect or a fruit.

Red can signal either 'don't eat me' or 'eat me' to consumers. I'm interested in seeing how applicants attempt to resolve this apparent paradox. This question is not about hoping students will display their expert knowledge of tigers. Most applicants would instinctively answer 'Yes I might follow up this question by asking if it would matter if less glamorous creatures — like fungi — went extinct. This question builds on general knowledge and material studied at school in biology and chemistry to assess how students approach a clinically-relevant problem.

Students have usually have learnt that the kidneys filter blood to remove waste products, such as urea, that must be eliminated from the body but many other useful substances which must not be lost — including glucose — are also filtered. The process involves reabsorption by a carrier protein that binds the glucose molecules and moves them out of the renal tubule and back into the blood.

Students should appreciate that, in binding glucose, the carrier will share properties with enzymes, about which they will have learned at school: the capacity to reabsorb glucose is finite because once all of the carriers are working maximally, no further glucose reabsorption can occur.

This question builds on commonly held knowledge and on material covered in Biology at school about visual processes. The question assesses criteria such as scientific curiosity has the applicant ever wondered this themselves? Have they formulated any theories? and scientific reasoning, based on information provided by the interviewer as the interview progresses. After establishing that the applicant understands that light is detected by photoreceptors in the eye and exploring and explaining this concept if it is a new one , the discussion would consider how the glow might be advantageous to the cat, seeing whether the applicant can appreciate that it may help the animal to see in the dark.

Possible explanations for the glow would be discussed with an expectation that applicants might recognise that the light could be generated within the eye or alternatively that light entering the eye is in some way reflected back out. Having established the second possibility as more being more plausible, the interviewer would probe to see whether the candidate recognises the significance of giving photoreceptors two chances to capture light as rays pass into and then out of the eye and why at night this might enhance vision.

How many different molecules can be made from six carbon atoms and twelve hydrogen atoms? This question gives candidates an opportunity to demonstrate a wide understanding of chemistry and there is no simple, immediate answer. Most candidates would start by drawing some molecules to construct some that satisfy the requirement of six carbons and twelve hydrogens.

During this process, the interviewer would also be looking at how well the candidate responds to prompting. After a few minutes, the interviewer may use the question to move the discussion toward concepts such as chirality, cis-trans isomerism, ring strain, and isotope effects.

Candidates may not have heard of these before, which is fine and to be expected; the interviewer wants to see how quickly the candidate picks up new concepts and whether they can offer plausible explanations for them. Why do you think Dido kills herself in Aeneid 4? I would open this part of the interview by asking the applicant to choose a Classical text that they have enjoyed. It really depends on what the applicant says they have read. The questions allow us to see whether candidates are open-minded and able to see how others, both today and, crucially, in the ancient world, might put the evidence from the texts together to draw different conclusions.

How do pirates divide their treasure? A group of 7 pirates has gold coins. They have to decide amongst themselves how to divide the treasure, but must abide by pirate rules:. This is a standard logic problem and is a good example of the type of question that could be asked. I like to see how students can take directions, and if they can break problems into smaller subsets, and work through a complex concept applying a solution in an algorithmic way.

If students have any questions, I want them to ask — not to sit in silence feeling stuck! We assume that the most senior pirate has the letter A. Others will be B, C, D etc, depending on how many there are in the group. So if pirate A bribes pirate C with 1 coin, pirate C will vote in favour. Pirate A knows that if he dies, then pirate C gets nothing again, it will become the 3 pirate case, and pirate C will be promoted to pirate B , so he needs 1 coin to bribe him.

Now Pirate A needs 3 votes, so he must bribe each of the pirates who would get 0 coins if he dies with 1 coin each. Pirate A gets 98 coins, pirate B gets 0, pirate C gets 1, pirate D gets 0, pirate E gets 1, pirate F gets 0. In this final stage although you can continue indefinitely! the senior pirate has to get 4 votes, so must bribe 3 pirates… might as well bribe the 3 that have the most to lose if he dies ie, pirates C, E and G.

Pirate A gets 97 coins, pirates C, E and G get 1 coin each, and the others get nothing. There is a wide range of other example interview questions on the Computer Science website. This question can be addressed in a variety of ways and addresses several of our selection criteria: an aptitude for analysing and solving a problem using a logical and critical approach; lateral thinking and hypothesis generation; the ability to manipulate quantities and units; and the ability to apply familiar concepts pressure, force etc.

to unfamiliar situations. Candidates often like to start off by thinking about the composition of the atmosphere, and how we might know that, what its density is, and then to ways of estimating its volume. We look to see if there are ways of simplifying the problem: for example, could you treat the Earth and atmosphere as a sphere slightly larger than the Earth and subtract the volume of the Earth from the larger sphere to get a volume for the atmosphere?

The difficulty with this approach often lies with determining where the atmosphere ends and how the density might vary with altitude, how applicable concepts like the ideal gas law are in these circumstances, and these are uncertainties that we might explore in a discussion. An alternate approach is to see if there are properties of the atmosphere that we can observe at the surface that might enable us to estimate the mass.

One such property is atmospheric pressure, which is a force per unit area. The force can also be described as a mass multiplied by an acceleration, which on Earth is the acceleration due to gravity. Hence, if we have some idea about atmospheric pressure we can calculate the mass pressing down on a unit area. If we can estimate the total surface area of the earth approximated by the surface area of a sphere we can therefore calculate the total mass of the atmosphere.

For this question, you are given a hand sample of rock to examine, and are asked to describe what you see. In the second part of the question, you are asked to suggest how the rock formed, and why it looks the way it does it is made of crystals of several different types, and the types of crystal vary in their average size.

This question does not rely on pre-existing knowledge of geology or rocks. In fact, what we are interested in is whether the candidates can make accurate and critical observations what does the rock look like? and are able to interpret the meaning of those observations using their knowledge of physical and chemical processes reasoning ability: aptitude for analysing and solving problems using logical approaches.

We want to see that they are motivated, and keen to engage with the topic. But we do want to see that they can get to grips with new information and use it in their reasoning.

So we often provide suggestions and small questions that help to guide the conversation at various points. In the first part of the question, when describing the rock, we want candidates to organise their observations, so they have some structure. For example, the rock is made of crystals, some of which have well-defined shapes. The crystals vary in colour and size, and probably represent different chemical compositions different minerals. The smaller types of crystals generally have less well-defined edges.

In the second part of the question, we want to see that candidates can use their knowledge of crystal formation — from GCSE and possibly A-level — to interpret why the rock appears as it does. The crystals indicate that the rock formed by crystallisation of molten rock from a liquid to a solid. Some crystals might be larger because they took longer to form. Crystals with poorly-defined shapes may have formed last, fitting into whatever space was available at the end of the process.

These observations can be used to discuss the history of cooling of molten rock. They are planning a four-day holiday in Venice and they each have euros to spend. They have already paid for their return flights and for their hotel room. On the flight to Venice Alex and Brian discuss how they should each allocate their spending over the four days. Explain why this might be a reasonable way to represent his preferences.

If he has these preferences how would you expect him to allocate his spending over the four days? Brian has the same preferences as Alex, but he knows that he tends to be impatient. If Brian has these preferences how would you expect him to allocate his spending over the four days?

Is there a better way for Brian to allocate his spending and, if so, how might he achieve this better outcome? Does your analysis of this problem have any implications for any current economic policy issues? After asking one or two general questions such as 'what topic in Economics have you enjoyed most, or found most surprising' we move on to working through a puzzle.

We give the candidate a copy 10 minutes before the interview starts. We might spend minutes going through the implications of the puzzle during the interview, though this depends on how far candidates get, and how quickly they get there! Each puzzle is designed to see how willing candidates are to abstract from the complexities of a 'real world' case involving some economic principles and to put such principles 'to work'. There is usually some simple mathematical ideas involved in this case, the idea that the utility function provided implies that it is best to allocate spending uniformly over the four days.

However, we do not expect any calculations to be performed, though drawing a diagram is often useful as it is in this example. Do bankers deserve the pay they receive? And should government do something to limit how much they get? This is a very topical question in light of the recent financial crisis. A simple answer might be that since banks are generally private firms and workers are free to work where they wish, then the pay they receive is just the outcome of a competitive labour market.

In this story, bankers earn a lot because they are very skilled and have rare talents. It is hard to see a reason for government intervention in this case — though on equity grounds one may want to have a progressive income tax system that redistributes some of this income. A good candidate would wonder why it is that seemingly equivalently talented people can get paid so much more in banking than in other occupations.

Do we really believe that bankers are so much better than other workers in terms of skill? An alternative story is that the banking industry is not competitive and generates profits above what a competitive market would produce.

This would then allow workers in that industry to share some of those profits and so earn much more. In this case, there is a role for government intervention - making the market more competitive. The key point about this question is trying to get candidates to think about the economics of pay rather than just whether they think it is fair or not. Place a 30cm ruler on top of one finger from each hand so that you have one finger at each end of the ruler, and the ruler is resting on your fingertips.

What happens when you bring your fingers together? This would never be the opening question in an interview - we usually start with a first question that gives the candidate an opportunity to get comfortable by discussing something familiar. We then ask more technical questions based on material in the GCSE and A-level syllabi. This question would come later in the interview, when we present candidates with an unfamiliar scenario and ask them to use what they know about familiar concepts such as friction to explain something.

Almost everyone in this example will expect the ruler to topple off the side where the finger is closest to the centre to the ruler because they expect this finger to reach the centre of the ruler first. They then complete the 'experiment' and find both fingers reach the centre of the ruler at the same time and the ruler remains balanced on two fingers. We like to see how candidates react to what is usually an unexpected result, and then encourage them to repeat the experiment slowly.

This helps them observe that the ruler slides over each finger in turn, starting with the finger that is furthest from the centre. With prompting to consider moments and friction, the candidate will come to the conclusion that moments mean that there is a larger force on the finger that is closest to the centre of the ruler.

This means that there is more friction between the ruler and this finger and therefore the rule slides over the finger furthest from the centre first. This argument will apply until the fingers are the same distance from the centre. The candidate should then be able to explain why both fingers reach the centre of the rule at the same time as observed. In some cases, particularly if we have not done a quantitative question already, we might then proceed with a quantitative analysis of forces and moments.

We might even discuss the fact that the coefficient of static friction is higher than the coefficient of dynamic friction and therefore the 'moving' finger gets closer to the centre than the static finger before the finger starts to move over the other finger. This is a great question because the candidate first has to determine the forces acting on the dam before considering the stability of the wall under the action of those forces.

Candidates will probably recognise that the water could push the dam over. The candidate would then be expected to construct simple mathematical expressions that predict when this would occur. Some may also discuss failure by sliding, issues of structural design, the effects of water seeping under the dam, and so on.

The candidate will not have covered all the material at school so guidance is provided to assess how quickly new ideas are absorbed.

The question also probes the candidate's ability to apply physics and maths to new situations and can test interest in and enthusiasm for the engineered world.

JK Rowling has just published a book for adults after the hugely successful Harry Potter series. In what ways do you think that writing for children is different to writing for adults? Candidates who have grown up on Harry Potter might have read Rowling's new book and have thought both about Rowling's change of audience and their own change as readers from child to adult. But even without knowing Rowling's work at all candidates could say something about themselves as readers, and how as readers they approach different kinds of books, and how writers develop a body of work and write for different audiences.

Mainly I always want to know that whatever they are reading, candidates are reading thoughtfully and self-consciously, and are able to think as literary critics about all the books they read.

I worry that not all candidates might have the same access to a wide range of literature, and I am careful to judge them on what they know, not on what they don't know. If I asked that question about Shakespeare some candidates might have a view of his literary output, but many wouldn't. If I start with Harry Potter, everyone at least has a starting point of recognition. And I think Rowling deserves a mention as I am sure that there are many people applying to study English at university this year who became avid readers because of her books.

Tell me about [this literary work you have mentioned in your UCAS personal statement]. I'd want to start with something the candidate has already identified as something they want to talk about so be honest on your personal statement! I'd want to get a sense of what the candidate picks out about it, and perhaps to try to move the discussion onto matters of form how the text is written rather than content what it is about.

That might include - how does the author choose to begin or end the work and why? is it a first-person or a third-person narrator, and what effect does that have? what kind of vocabulary and writing style are chosen? what assumptions does it make about its readers? There might be other questions too: does the biography of the author have any relevance to our interpretation? do we need to know something about the historical context to understand it differently?

how would we evaluate whether it is 'good' or not, and does that matter? where might its meaning be ambiguous? can it be compared to one of the other texts mentioned or studied to clarify any one of these aspects? Why do you think an English student might be interested in the fact that Coronation Street has been running for 50 years? First and foremost this brings popular culture into the mix and also shows that techniques of literary analysis can be applied to other media.

The question gives candidates an opportunity to apply concepts from their A level geography course to their home area.

They might discuss urban planning and regeneration, ethnic segregation and migration, or issues of environmental management. It reveals the extent to which they have a curiosity about the world around them. By asking specifically about their home area the question eliminates any advantage gained by those who are more widely travelled and have more experience of a variety of geographical contexts.

We use this question to open a discussion that could go in a number of different directions. We want to encourage candidates to talk about a subject on which they know something, but where probing questions can lead them to look at what they know in a new and revealing light. It was very common for candidates to say that nothing interesting ever happens where they live, but this was a chance for the interviewers to encourage them to reflect on what we mean by historical significance, and why some places seem unremarkable in those terms.

It also allowed us to hear candidates describe things like a town in decline, unusual street names, or pride in local sports teams, and then to ask them what questions a historian should ask in order to set these in context. Is violence always political? Does 'political' mean something different in different contexts? This pair of questions allows the interviewer to deal with historical material from any period the candidate is studying or knows about from more general reading.

It could also be answered extremely well from contemporary or current affairs knowledge. The aim of the question is to get the candidate to challenge some received notions about what constitutes politics, and to think about how political history might be studied away from the usual kings, parliaments etc. A good candidate would, with assistance, begin to construct categories of when violence looks more and less political. A very good candidate would, with assistance, begin to construct a useful definition of 'political', but this is challenging.

The main aim would not be to solve these problems, but to use them to find some new interest in a subject that the candidate already knows something about. Imagine we had no records about the past at all, except everything to do with sport — how much of the past could we find out about?

I would say this to a candidate who had mentioned an interest in sport on their personal statement, though it could equally be applied to an interest in something else — like film, drama, or music. What I would be looking for is to see how the candidate might use their imagination, building on something they know about probably much more than I do to tackle questions of historical research. I would usually ask supplementary questions, to push the students further — and often, I would have no answer in my mind, but would simply be interested in seeing how far the student could push their analysis.

Which person or sort of person in the past would you most like to interview, and why? The question is not so much about which person the candidate wants to meet, but what sort of issues the candidate wants to find out about which can be quite revealing and then working out the best way to do so.

Or if they wanted to find out what we don't know about any given period, they might want to interview people who didn't leave any written records. Sometimes we might encourage the candidate to think through whether the person they selected would be willing or able to reveal the information they sought and we allow plenty of time for the candidate to change the issue they want to find out about, and reconsider their choice of person.

The aim of this question is to encourage candidates to think critically, creatively and comparatively about how historians know what happened in the past. I would use this sort of open question to allow a candidate to talk about the availability of historical evidence in whatever time period, place or theme interested them from their school-work or wider reading.

For instance, a candidate might start off by saying that they had been studying Tudor England and historians don't know much about the lives of the poor because they were less likely to be able to write. Given these lower levels of literacy, we could then talk about what sources historians can use to learn about the lives of the majority of the population in sixteenth-century England. This would require the candidate to think creatively about alternative sources and their drawbacks , such as, for instance, criminal court records in which people who could not write were required to give oral testimony as witnesses.

Historians are always interested in explaining continuity and change over time, so I might then ask the candidate to compare what historians can know about Tudor England to another time period or place that interests them. For instance, if they had also studied the USA during the Depression, I might ask the candidate whether the gaps in historical evidence are different in interwar America. By thinking comparatively across four-hundred years and in different continents, a candidate might be able to draw some thoughtful conclusions.

They might want to think about how structures of power have altered over time or about how social norms for what can be recorded and kept in archives have changed. This is the sort of conversation that no candidate could predict in advance. The hope is that the discussion allows candidates to show their understanding of, and enthusiasm for, history, and — most importantly — their ability to think independently, flexibly, and imaginatively about the past.

There is no right answer to this question. For example, can you take a car without driving it, or even without moving it? Our focus is on the candidate's reasoning — how he or she formulates an initial definition, and how he or she then applies and refines that initial definition in response to hypothetical examples provided by the interviewers. One example might be: 'I am walking along the street when it starts to rain.

I open the door of an unlocked car and sit there for 15 minutes until the rain passes. If the punishment for parking on double yellow lines were death, and therefore nobody did it, would that be a just and effective law?

Candidates are not meant to give a right or wrong answer to this question.

Please see the subject-specific provisional interview timetable for interviews in December for entry , which will be held online. Explore the information here to find out what to expect and how to prepare. See the Technology tab above for more subject-specific information on online interviews. There are lots of myths about interviews at Oxford, but really they're just conversations about your chosen subject - like a short tutorial - with someone who knows a lot about it.

A good deal of the teaching at Oxford takes place in small classes or tutorials, and your interviewers — who may be your future tutors — are assessing your ability to study, think and learn in this way. The interview is designed to assess your academic potential. Tutors are looking for your self-motivation and enthusiasm for your subject. Decisions are not based on your manners, appearance or background, but on your ability to think independently and to engage with new ideas beyond the scope of your school or college syllabus.

Oxford typically receives over 22, applications for around 3, places every year and shortlists approximately 10, candidates. Tutors shortlist the candidates they feel have the strongest potential and meet their selection criteria best. Only those shortlisted are invited to interview. If you do not get shortlisted for interview, unfortunately that means that your application has not been successful.

If you are shortlisted for interview - congratulations! Being invited to attend our interviews is a fantastic achievement in its own right, considering the number of strongly competitive applications that we receive each year.

You will receive a letter or an email indicating whether or not you have been invited for interview, usually between the middle of November and early December. Different courses will issue invitations on different days depending on when their interviews are scheduled.

Your email or letter will usually come from the college you applied to. If you submitted an open application, it will come from the college you have been allocated to. Sometimes you might get invited to interview by a college you did not apply to. This is part of our reallocation process, where applicants get moved around to make sure everyone interviewed has a similar chance of being made an offer. The provisional interview timetable is available to view. All interviews are expected to take place in early to mid-December so please make sure you are going to be available during this time as interviews cannot be rearranged.

You are quite likely to have more than one interview. You might also be interviewed by more than one college. In some subjects, you will be invited to interviews at more than one college before your interviews start. In other subjects, you might have 'initial' interviews at your first college and then be invited to an 'additional' interview at another college after these have taken place.

We aim to give everyone a minimum of 24 hours' notice of these additional interviews. Online interviews should take place where applicants feel able to perform at their best. This should be somewhere you have reliable access to the required technology details to follow and a quiet space, free from distraction. We hope that this will be either in your school or college, or your home or similar environment. Some applicants may benefit from enhanced school or college support, including those with special requirements as a result of a disability or those who have difficulty accessing the appropriate technology or a stable internet connection.

We would be very grateful if schools and colleges could support applicants in these circumstances. You will be interviewed by academic tutors, usually from a college. They teach and research at the University and decide who studies here. Normally you will be interviewed by two tutors, occasionally more. If you are applying for a joint course, with two or more subjects, you should expect to be interviewed by tutors representing each of the subjects.

For some joint courses you may be interviewed separately for each subject area. Tutors will understand that you may be nervous and will try to put you at your ease.

They want you to feel able to be yourself in the interview, and to allow you to demonstrate your skills and abilities. They will probably ask you a few simple questions to begin with: perhaps about something in your personal statement or why you have applied for a particular course. They will then move on to questions about your subject. Depending on what is relevant for the course you are applying for, you may be given a text, a poem, a graph, or an object, and then asked to answer questions and comment on it.

You may be given these before the interview, and will be advised if there is anything in particular on which you need to focus. Tutors may also refer to any written work that you were asked to submit. Questions may be about the subjects that you are currently studying at school or college. However, you will also be offered opportunities to show whether you have read around the subject and to demonstrate your knowledge and interest beyond your school or college syllabus.

Go to the demonstration interview videos and sample interview questions tabs for more of an idea of what to expect. There may well be more than one right way to answer a question in which case tutors will be more interested in exploring your thought process.

Remember they are trying to find out how you think, so anything you say will interest them. Many questions are designed to test your ability to apply logic and reason to an idea you may never have encountered before. Tutors love their subject and they want to teach people who feel likewise. Sometimes tutors may suggest an alternative way of looking at a problem.

They are looking for evidence that you are willing to engage with new ideas, and that you can be flexible in your thinking. Often your answers will lead to a discussion and students sometimes feel they learn a lot in interviews — despite their nerves.

Interviewers are not trying to make you feel ignorant or catch you out, but to stretch you in order to assess your potential. Tutors may ask you about extra-curricular activities which you have mentioned in your personal statement, particularly to help you settle into the interview.

However extra-curricular activities will not be assessed unless they help to demonstrate how you meet the selection criteria for your course.

If you are given the chance to ask your own questions at the end of the interview, this does not form any part of your assessment. If there are any adjustments you need because of a disability, make sure that the college which has invited you to interview knows about these as soon as possible. Please see the interviews section of our Guidance for disabled applicants page for more advice. We understand that it can be difficult to know what to expect from Oxford interviews or how to prepare, particularly if you or your teachers don't know anyone who has been shortlisted before.

The following guidance aims to cover what we would like all shortlisted candidates to know. After reading this and exploring the available resources, we hope you can feel prepared and able to demonstrate your academic ability and potential.

Once you are clear on the practicalities and arrangements for your interview, we recommend you begin to think about the content of the interview itself, the sort of questions you might be asked and what you would like tutors to know about how and what you think about your subject.

You should also think about any revision you might need to do. Our top tip is to practise speaking about your subject and your thoughts about what you've seen or read - these don't have to be formal 'mock interviews' - instead they could be chats with teachers, friends, or family.

If you aren't able to speak to other people, why not record a vlog to practise speaking, or hold an imaginary interview in your head, or even talk to the cat! Whilst watching our demonstration interview videos see tab , stop and start as many times as you like, so you can think about what your own answers might have been.

It will all help you on the day. Our provisional interview timetable gives an indication of how interviews are scheduled in December. All interviews for entry took place online using Microsoft Teams. Any additional technology required depended on the course students were being interviewed for. Technology requirements have been divided into three tiers, with tier 1 involving the least technology and tier 3 requiring the most.

Most courses are in tier 1 where you will only need a computer for video conferencing using Microsoft Teams. Interviews for some subjects are likely to require the use of a shared virtual whiteboard and in other, more mathematical subjects, a separate touchscreen device will be needed for the whiteboard along with a basic universal stylus so you can share mathematical notation, draw sketches, annotate diagrams or text, or add text. No candidate or their school will be expected to purchase a touchscreen device in order to participate in their Oxford interviews.

Where necessary, for tier 3 subjects and where there are more technology requirements, colleges will discuss arrangements with schools and applicants in order to find a practical solution for everyone involved. The tables below outline which subject will use each tier and the technology needed for each. You may be invited to more than one interview. Your invitation will also include all other information you need to be aware of in advance of your interview. Read our detailed guidance on how to connect to Microsoft Teams for your online interview.

In some cases, interviews are expected to take place in schools, and so you and your school will need to check that you have access to the required technology listed here. Please note that, in a small number of cases, you might be invited to an interview that uses a lower technology tier than the one listed below for instance, you may not require Tier 3 technology for a Philosophy interview if applying for Mathematics and Philosophy.

This will be explained to you in your invitation to interview. We recommend that, for all tiers of interviews, you and your school, if applicable test your technology setup in advance of interviews. Ancient and Modern History, Archaeology and Anthropology, Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, Classics, Classics and English, Classics and Modern Languages, Classics and Oriental Studies, English and Modern Languages, English Language and Literature, European and Middle Eastern Languages, Experimental Psychology, Fine Art, Geography, History, History and English, History and Modern Languages, History and Politics, History of Art, Human Sciences, Law, Law with Law Studies in Europe, Materials Science, Medicine, Medicine Graduate-entry , Modern Languages, Modern Languages and Linguistics, Oriental Studies, Philosophy and Modern Languages, Philosophy and Theology, Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics, Religion and Oriental Studies, Theology and Religion.

A computer, with a microphone, speakers and a webcam with access to Microsoft Teams as the video conferencing tool, either installed in advance or via an internet browser. You do not need to have a Microsoft account in order to use Microsoft Teams for this purpose. Other than Microsoft Teams, you do not need any additional hardware or software for interviews in this tier. During the interview your interviewers may wish to show you a document by sharing their screen or to hold something up to the camera for you to see.

Biochemistry, Economics and Management, History and Economics, Music, Philosophy, Politics and Economics. For interviews in this tier, you will also need access to an online virtual whiteboard via the website or app, Miro www. com , on the same device on which you are accessing Microsoft Teams. We recommend that you create a Miro account prior to your interview to practise using a whiteboard — this is free to do. When you create an account, you will need to give your email address and create a password.

This triggers a 6-digit access code which is sent to your email address. You will be asked during registration to give your company name and role but here you can instead just enter your full name and when asked for your role, click on the option "Not company-related". Either before your interview or at the start of your interview, you will receive a link by email to a Miro whiteboard from the Oxford college running your interview.

You will need to follow this link, which will open the whiteboard either in your browser or in the Miro app.

Top 10 Interview Questions For 2022 (With Sample Answers),Share This

Please see the subject-specific provisional interview timetable for interviews in December (for entry), which will be held online. Explore the information here to find out what to  · In this article, we provide online interview tips to aid you before, during and after a virtual call with a prospective employer. 15 online interview tips. Preparation is a critical The English Online Interview (EOI) is a powerful online tool for assessing the English skills of students between Foundation and Year 2 and is aligned to English in the Victorian Curriculum 50 rows · Classics and English: First interviews, usually just with a first college, will take place  · more. NDA 2 Expected Interview Date NDA 2 exam was conducted on 04 September Many aspirants must clear the expected cutoff marks of the exam and To find out how you can use the content, check the site's copright terms. Look for a link at the bottom of the webpage ... read more

This question encourages students to think about what high-diversity habitats such as rainforests and coral reefs have in common. Join for free. This question gives candidates an opportunity to demonstrate a wide understanding of chemistry and there is no simple, immediate answer. The fact is you may have several accomplishments you could pick from. In fact, one of the best ways to turn the interview from an "interrogation" into a "conversation between colleagues" is to ask questions throughout the interview. Download our " Job Interview Questions and Answers PDF Cheat Sheet " that gives you word-for-word sample answers to the interview questions IN THIS ARTICLE including:. This question builds on commonly held knowledge and on material covered in Biology at school about visual processes.

When I've used this question in live audiences, sometimes people say they'd pick the number just because it'd throw a spanner in the works for everyone playing the game rationally. English Online Interview. Language Lessons German French Japanese Sign Language More. EOI Guide, english online interview dates 2022. Additionally, I understand the value of doing my own research to find answers, as well as asking intelligent questions of those around me.

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